Future will honor US Senator Harry Reid – far-sighted on dangers of nuclear wastes

There will be a lot written about Harry’s advocacy on behalf of Nevada, and for those efforts he deserves a standing ovation. His actions will resonate for generations. Our grandchildren’s grandchildren will have been kept protected from the threats of nuclear waste. They won’t know who to thank, so on their behalf: Thank you, Harry.

 Thank you, Harry Sunday, March 29, 2015 http://www.sentryreview.com/breaking/thank-you-harry-h6500.html We knew the day would come. We just weren’t certain when. Seventy-five-year-old Harry Reid has announced that just after 5 terms of representing Nevada’s finest interests in the U.S. Senate — the longest run of any senator from our state — he will retire into the waiting arms of his loving wife, Landra.

They have considerably to celebrate, and we — and our youngsters and grandchildren — have considerably to be thankful for, including a legacy that will attain far into future generations of Nevadans.

The senator’s list of accomplishments, from preserving the environment to assisting bring overall health care to millions

with his championing of the Reasonably priced Care Act, will absolutely frame his legacy. But his everlasting accomplishment story will surely be his good results in staring down the nuclear power business and maintaining Nevada totally free of the highly radioactive nuclear waste that outsiders wanted to ship from distant states and bury inside Yucca Mountain.

Practically nothing better epitomizes his courage and commitment to Nevada than his capacity to thwart the politically immoral effort to force lethal fuel rods from out-of-state nuclear power generators down our throats and into the bowels of a volcanic ridgeline just 90 miles outdoors of Las Vegas.

No other state would stand for it no other state has provided to deal with it. Absolutely everyone looked to Nevada, poked us in the chest like a bully and expected us to cower. But Harry does not cower. He pokes back because he knows what’s at stake is practically nothing significantly less than the safety, welfare and economic security of all Nevadans.

Nevada was against the ropes from the very first round when Congress overpowered us and designated Yucca Mountain as the ultimate repository of spent fuel rods. Although they’re no longer efficient for energy plants, they stay so deadly that the search was launched to find a location to hide them for much more than one hundred,000 years.

Nevada, along with Deaf Smith County, Texas, and Hanford, Wash., have been identified as probable burial internet sites, but Congress decided to quicken the pace and told the Power Division to just concentrate on Yucca Mountain.

Following some poking and prodding, it became clear Yucca Mountain wasn’t rather up to specs. The program was to come across a solid hunk of real estate that could, on its personal, safely include nuclear waste. As an alternative, it was realized that Yucca Mountain was truly going to have to be a fixer-upper, a deficient tomb for higher-level nuclear waste and in desperate need of a vast amount of engineering work inside to get it to pass inspection. Testing prompted issues about Yucca being too porous to provide a protective shield, of threat of earthquakes and moisture dripping onto the caskets and corroding them.

Had this been a residence, possible buyers would have howled in protest and walked away.

But in this case, what with so a great deal cash in the coffers, the momentum was to move forward and come across approaches to make the mountain protected. And what assurances had been there that such a level of security could be reached and maintained? There had been, after all, no other models for this sort of facility, so assessments of Yucca’s lengthy-term security (which means 100,000 years) were based on assumptions and pc modeling.

Meantime, someone suggested, how about moving nuclear waste to Yucca’s front door on a temporary basis until the tunnels inside had been made leak-proof? Harry and his Senate colleague from Nevada, former Gov. Richard Bryan, put a stop to that notion.

Taking a longer view of the trouble, Harry regularly and successfully utilized his leadership role to reduce extra than $1 billion from then-President George W. Bush’s Yucca Mountain spending budget requests. For good measure, Harry redlined $27 million that was sought by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, whose job was to license the storage project. And from 2005 on, Reid continued to chip away at Yucca Mountain’s budget till President Barack Obama entirely eliminated funding for the project in 2011, 2012 and 2013. When efforts were made to restore funding, Harry squashed them like some giant flyswatter.

It wasn’t sufficient for Harry to simply shield Nevada from nuclear waste. He authored the Power and Water Appropriates Act of 2009 that supplied almost $200 million to terminate the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste project and fund a blue ribbon commission requested by the president to conduct a comprehensive critique of policies for managing nuclear waste and advocate a new strategy. In 2012, the commission concluded, among other findings, that spent nuclear fuel or other higher-level waste ought to not be forced upon any state, community or tribe without having its permission.

Harry Reid has been tirelessly vigilant and prosperous in guarding Nevada from the risks of housing nuclear waste and in advocating that nobody else ought to be forced to defend itself from an assault by the nuclear energy market.

There will be a lot written about Harry’s advocacy on behalf of Nevada, and for those efforts he deserves a standing ovation. His actions will resonate for generations. Our grandchildren’s grandchildren will have been kept protected from the threats of nuclear waste. They won’t know who to thank, so on their behalf: Thank you, Harry.

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